Jottings – Freedom from the Penalty, Power, and Presence of Sin

“Assembly

Referring to Romans 8:21:

 

When Christ finally imprisons Satan, He will deliver the entire creation from this bondage, and all nature will enjoy with us “the glorious liberty of the children of God” (v. 21). What a thrilling salvation we have: free from the penalty of sin because Christ died for us (Romans 5); free from the power of sin because we died with Christ to the flesh (Romans 6) and to the Law (Romans 7); and someday we shall be free from the very presence of sin when nature is delivered from bondage.

 
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Wiersbe, Warren W. Wiersbe’s Expository Outlines on the New Testament. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1992. Print. [emphasis added, chapter references reformatted]

 

 

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Jottings – As Goes the Oversight So Goes the Assembly

“Assembly

…it is well to remember that assemblies are, to a very great extent, what the oversight makes them. If we know the spiritual condition and order of the oversight, we know what to expect in the meeting. If the former is composed of wise, godly, well-taught and well-balanced men, the same characteristics will be manifest through the rank-and-file of the meeting. Hence the deep importance of overseers being divinely fitted for their office and work, in order that they may be ensamples to the flock.

 

Hinman, C. H. “Divine Qualifications For Oversight.” Ed. J R Caldwell. Witness XXXIV. — New Series, XIV. –04 1904: 165-67. Print. Emphasis Original.

PDF available here.

 

Special thanks to brother Jack Spender who referred to this excellent article at the 2015 Workers and Elders Conference. Audio is available here. Address #10.

 

 

 

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Jottings – Praise is Never Out of Season

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The apostles, we must remark, very frequently suspended their writing in order to lift up their hearts in praise. Praise is never out of season, and it is no interruption to interrupt any engagement in order to laud and magnify our God.

 

C. H. Spurgeon, “A Psalm For The New Year,” in The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit Sermons, Vol. 8. Originally preached on January 5, 1862. (London: Passmore & Alabaster, 1862), 8.

 

Thanks Keith!

 

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Jottings – The Power From On High

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It is extraordinary grace, not talent, that wins the day. It is extraordinary spiritual power, not extraordinary mental power, that we need. Mental power may fill a chapel; but spiritual power fills the Church. Mental power may gather a congregation; spiritual power will save souls. We want spiritual power. Oh! we know some before whom we shrink into nothing as to talent, but who have no spiritual power; and when they speak, they have not the Holy Spirit with them; but we know others—simple-hearted, worthy men, who speak their country dialect, and who stand up to preach, and whether it be in a barn, or the village green, the Spirit of God clothes every word with power. Hearts are broken, souls are saved, and sinners are born again. O Spirit of the living God! we want Thee. Thou art the life, the soul, the source of Thy people’s success. Without Thee they can do nothing; with Thee they can do everything. Dear readers, we want above all things, the ‘power from on high.’

 

C. H. Spurgeon, “Preface,” in The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit Sermons, Vol. 8. (London: Passmore & Alabaster, 1862), vi.

 

Thanks Keith!

 

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Jottings – Do Not Put Yourself Outside of the Circle of Those Who Crucified Him

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Referring to Isaiah 53:4-6 ~

 

Do not put yourself outside of the circle of those who crucified Him.

 

Beers, Tim. Sermon. North York Gospel Chapel, York, PA. May 31, 2015

 

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Jottings – Salvation is About Jesus Christ and What He Can Do

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Salvation is NOT about you and what you can do. Salvation is about Jesus Christ and what He can do.

 

Beers, Tim. Sermon. North York Gospel Chapel, York, PA. May 31, 2015

 

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Jottings – The Dawn of a New Day

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Commenting on the writing prophets:

 

[The prophets] rebuked sin in high places as well as low places. They warned the nation. They pleaded with a proud people to humble themselves and return to God. Fire and tears were mingled in their message, which was not one of doom and gloom alone, for they saw the Day of the Lord and the glory to follow. All of them looked through the darkness to the dawn of a new day. In the night of sin they saw the light of a coming Savior and Sovereign; they saw the millennial kingdom coming in all its fullness.

 

McGee, J. Vernon (John Vernon). Thru the Bible with J. Vernon McGee, Volume 3. Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson, 1981. page 184. Print.

 

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Jotting – When God’s People Rise Up As An Enemy Against God

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Commenting on Micah 2:8-10

 

But if the professed people of God “rise up as an enemy,” and refuse to heed His Word (as in vers. 8 and 9), then comes the call for separation from what is unclean and unholy, “Arise ye, and depart; for this is not your rest: because it is polluted” (ver. 10). To continue in fellowship with what is opposed to God’s mind will result in desolation. We are called to “buy the truth, and sell it not.”

 

Ironside, H. A. Notes on the Minor Prophets. Neptune, NJ: Loizeaux Brothers, 1909. Print.

 

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Jottings – Are You an Overcomer?

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Commenting on Micah 2:

 

It is the will of God that those whom He has taken into covenant relationship with Himself should ever be overcomers. If it is otherwise, the fault is in them— not in Him. He has abundant resources for the believer to draw upon. But where unbelief and disobedience hold sway, spiritual paralysis must necessarily ensue.

 

Ironside, H. A. Notes on the Minor Prophets. Neptune, NJ: Loizeaux Brothers, 1909. Print.

 

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Jottings – John Wesley’s Best Friend

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In these days, it was customary for the itinerant and local preachers to take breakfast together, on Sunday mornings, at City Road. On one occasion, when Wesley was present, a young man rose and found fault with one of his seniors. The Scotch blood of Thomas Rankin was roused, and he sharply rebuked the juvenile for his impertinence; but, in turn, was as sharply rebuked himself. Wesley instantly replied: ‘I will thank the youngest man among you to tell me of any fault you see in me; in doing so, I shall consider him as my best friend.’ This was quite enough to silence Rankin.

 

Luke Tyerman, The Life and Times of John Wesley, Vol. 3. (London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1871), 567. The incident dates from 1789, less than two years prior to Wesley’s homecall.

 

Thanks Keith!

 

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