A Chart On The Course Of Time From Eternity To Eternity

 

A E Booth - A Chart on the Course of Time from Eternity to Eternity

 

Recently I shared with you Ironside’s helpful chart of The Revelation of Jesus Christ. Another helpful chart regarding prophesy and the larger topic of the Dispensations is A E Booth’s A Chart on the Course Of Time from Eternity to Eternity.

Key To A Chart On The Course Of Time From Eternity To Eternity - A E Booth - Cover PhotoIf you are not familiar with the chart I would encourage you to check it out. At the very least the chart is absolutely fascinating and provides one with motivation to study God’s Holy Word. For example, many are surprised to see the chart as depicting Satan in heavenly places. What’s that all about? See Ephesians 2:2 and 6:11-12.

Brother Booth also authored a companion publication “Key to a Chart” to help one in navigating the chart’s symbolism and to provide the student of God’s Word with some deeper explanations and Scripture references.

The chart and it’s accompanying booklet are available through a handful of retailers including Moments With The Book. A modern computer drawn rendition of the chart is available in three different sizes: 12″ x 31.5″, 18″ x 48″, and 42″ x 114″ as well as Booth’s Key.

A free, scanned copy of A E Booth’s companion booklet The Course of Time From Eternity to Eternity Key to a Chart is available here.

As always, be a good Berean (Acts 17:11) by examining the Scriptures to see if what one is teaching is in fact true.

Joseph was right: interpretations belong to God (Genesis 40:8). While sermons, commentaries, and charts can be helpful to some extent one must never base their faith in such helps– rather our faith must be based on God’s Word alone. Sola scriptura. There are no shortcuts.

 

Read More

Ironside’s Revelation Chart

H A Ironside's Revelation Chart

 

Earlier today I discovered on The Blue Letter Bible H A Ironside’s The Revelation of Jesus Christ Chart. The chart gives a panoramic view of the book of Revelation and is a wonderful tool to help study or teach the book of Revelation.

Personally, I have always enjoyed Ironside’s books– the writing style is simple and straight forward, yet his teaching is deep. If you are not familiar with his writings you can still obtain many of his tomes today. In print from Kregel Publications and digitally form Logos Bible Software.

Jump directly to the chart on The Blue Letter Bible here.

Note: this is a “refurbished” chart– it is not Ironside’s original art work. I believe the depiction of the seven seals on the refurbished chart is incorrect— all seven seals are depicted on the front. This would require the removal of all seven before the scroll could even start to open.

Whereas Ironside’s original Revelation chart depicted only the first seal on front of the scroll and the six remaining seals sequentially along the side edge edge of the scroll. This would allow for the scroll to be opened section by section as each seal is opened. In the book that accompanies the chart, Lectures on The Book of Revelation, Ironside explains the significance of the placement of the seals:

When we read of a “book” we must not think of a volume such as we are familiar with, but rather of a roll of parchment. The ancient books of Israel were generally sheepskin rolls; and when we are told that this book was sealed with seven seals, we are to understand that the book was rolled up to a certain point, and there a seal was put upon the edge, so that it could not be opened until that seal was broken. It was rolled up a little farther and another seal put on, and so on, until there were six seals on the edge of the book and one seal closing the entire scroll. When the first seal was opened a certain portion of the book was exposed to view, and so with each one following.1

Enjoy!

 

1Ironside, Harry A. Lectures on The Book of Revelation. Neptune, NJ: Loizeaux Brothers, 1920 & 1987. p. 89.

 

Read More

WWW Wednesday: Best iPad eBook Apps for Preaching

Google Play Books icon

My regular Wednesday Why We Web Blog post is now available.

This week I explore which eBook apps you should consider using to help you study in preparation for preaching.

The WWW article reviews six specific iPad eBook apps that I have found helpful when preparing sermons. Check it out… and be sure to leave a comment!

Link: Preaching with an iPad Part 4: Best eBook Apps for Preaching

 

Read More

New Scripture Index Feature!

 

Digital Sojourner is rolling out a new feature to help you quickly find articles that you are interested in. You can access this feature at any time by clicking on “Scripture Index” on the website’s top menu bar as illustrated above. The option can also be found on the bottom menu bar.

 

Digital Sojourner Scripture Index Screen Shot

Digital Sojourner Scripture Index Screen Shot

 

When you arrive at the index you will find a listing of all the books of the Bible for which there is a reference. Click on the book you are interested in and a listing of all the references, in verse order, will appear (if you click on the name of the book a second time the references will be hidden). Simply find the Scripture passage you are interested in and then click the name of the Digital Sojourner article. You will then be taken to that article. To return to the index click your browser’s back button or click on the menu bar’s Scripture Index option again.

The index is still a work in progress as many references and articles from last year still need to be entered, so be sure to check back often as this feature continues to develop.

 

Read More

Read The Bible 2013 – Two Suggested Methods

bible headphones

At this time of year many people make new year’s resolutions or set goals to achieve. One goal that is certainly worthy of our limited time is the reading of the entire Bible from cover to cover.

This may seem like a daunting task; However, it is certainly an attainable goal for most people. While some read faster than others, the average amount of time it takes to read the English Bible is 75 hours. If you do the math this works out to be about 12½ minutes a day. So, if you can dedicate just 15 minutes a day you should have no problem reading the Bible from cover to cover in one year.

To keep you on track here are two methods to aid you along the way:

 


A Printed Bible Reading Plan



 

There are many excellent paper based reading plans available. My suggestion is to use a plan that is printed on a single page that can be folded and kept in your Bible… As you read simply check off each portion completed. What could possibly be easier than that?

Here are some free options to consider:

 


A Digital Bible Reading Plan



 

There are numerous advantages in using modern technology to aid you in your Bible reading endeavors. For example there are several free tools available that will track your reading progress, email you a reminder if you fall behind, and even read the Bible to you!

In this category my favorite choice is YouVersion. YouVersion is available online through their webpage… but they also offer native apps for both popular and not-so-popular mobile devices. No matter how many devices you use your reading progress is immediately updated through ‘the cloud’ to all of your devices.

I have personally used YouVersion for my systematic reading over the last two years on my Android phone, iPad, and desktop. There service has always performed flawlessly.

Did I mention their service is completely free? Check out their whole Bible reading plans here.

As a second choice I would recommend eBible. Their resources are accessed through the web or through a mobile app on an Android or iOS device. Unfortunately eBible does not offer nearly as many reading plans as YouVersion does. Also, where YouVersion is completely free; eBible follows a ‘freemium’ pricing model. This means that their basic features are free, but their more advanced features require a paid subscription.

Well, there you are. My two suggestions for how to go about reading the Bible in 2013. So, are you up to the challenge?

 

[photo credit]

 

Read More

WWW Wednesday: A Digital Bible Worth Considering

eBible iconMy regular Wednesday Post on the Why We Web Blog is now available.

There are numerous digital options for reading the Bible. Recently I have found myself returning over and over again to a relatively new offering that brings to the table some very interesting features. Checkout my Wednesday Why We Web blog post for all the details.

Link: A Digital Bible Worth Considering

 

Read More

Two Roads Two Destinies Chart

The Two Roads And The Two Destinies

 

Through a Christian Facebook group I recently discovered that the “Two Roads Two Destinies” evangelistic chart is available online for free in PDF format. If you are not familiar with the chart it is an excellent tool for sharing the message of the Gospel.

The chart is available in several different languages in up to three different variations (depending on the language). There is also a 22 lesson study guide available in 4 languages– including English and Spanish.

The resource has been made available by the saints at the Moncton Gospel Hall of Moncton, NB Canada. Thank you!

Jump directly to the download page here.

 

Read More

How To Do A Word Study With Digital Tools

I’ve been highlighting tools that can be used to do an effective Bible Study and so far we’ve underscored reading the text. Repeatedly. And taking notes while reading. But now I want to highlight how a person might want to examine the meanings of words.

One of your better tools is the English dictionary. If you’re using the KJV, this winds up being more difficult but the point here is that words mean something and sometimes our misreading can be predicated on what we think a word means.

  • Free: Dictionaries are readily available online at several sites (m-w, dictionary.com, the Free Dictionary).
  • Not-Free: More expensive programs have dictionaries but I find it easier just to hop over to Websters online.

Sometimes, folk want to see the meaning of the original language by examining a word, like the word love or church (for example).

I don’t think that this is the best way for most of us to study the Bible.

Read More

How To Do A Parallel Bible Reading

We’re talking about using some digital tools for Bible study with emphasis on highlighting general pros and cons to each tool. If you recall, our text is John 1 but we left off still in the reading stage. This post is also going to be about reading but instead on a focus on parallel reading. (Note, to ward off any Evil Eyes: I intentionally changed the order of the Greek to visually correspond with the English so (1) I don’t want to hear the complaint and (2) it doesn’t matter because the subject is still essentially grammatically underscored. There, bases covered.)

Read More

How To Read An E-Bible For Studying

I want to highlight features of different tools—be they online only, downloadable, or something you just have to pay for. Of course, we won’t be able to do this all in one post, so you’ll have to tune in.

Read More
p 2 of 41234