Jottings – Who Is Lord of Your Prime Time?

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It is impossible for any Christian who spends the bulk of his evenings, month after month, week upon week, day in and day out watching TV networks or contemporary videos to have a Christian mind. This is always true of all Christians in every situation! A Biblical mental program cannot coexist with worldly programming… we need to allow Christ to be Lord of our prime time.

 

Hughes, R. Kent. Disciplines of a Godly Man. Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 1991. p75. Print.

 

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Jottings – There Is a Great Difference Between Being Occupied With What You Are Saved From And What You Are Saved To

“John


 

There is a great difference between being occupied with what you are saved from, and what you are saved to. If you are occupied with the first, it is only relief that is before you; if with the second, you are occupied with the hope of the gospel. Our blessed Lord was not satisfied with getting us out of misery, but He obtained the Father’s house for us.

 

J.B. Stoney, “Salvation,” in Steps In Light in Collected Writings, Vol. 1 (1887), 1; electronic ed. accessed on 3/25/15 here: http://www.mcclean.me.uk/mse/jbs/jbs1.htm

 

Thanks Keith!

 

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Jottings – The Devil Does Not Select an Ignorant or Immoral Man to Make His Grand and Special Attacks Upon the Bible

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To say or think that there is so much as a single clause, or a single expression, from cover to cover of the inspired volume, unworthy of our prayerful meditation, is to imply that God the Holy Ghost has thought it worth His while to write what we do not think it worth our while to study. ‘All Scripture is given by inspiration of God’ (2 Timothy 3:16). This commands our reverence. ‘Whatsoever things were written aforetime were written for our learning’ (Romans 15:4). This awakens our personal interest. The former of these quotations proves that Scripture comes from God; the latter proves that it comes to us. That and this, taken together, bind us to God by the divine link of holy Scripture—a link which the devil, in this our day, is doing his very utmost to snap; and that, too, by means of agents of acknowledged moral worth and intellectual power. The devil does not select an ignorant or immoral man to make his grand and special attacks upon the Bible, for he knows full well that the former could not speak, and the latter would not get a hearing; but he craftily takes up some amiable, benevolent, and popular person—some one of blameless morals—a laborious student, a profound scholar, a deep and original thinker. Thus he throws dust in the eyes of the simple, the unlearned, and the unwary.

 

C. H. Mackintosh, Genesis to Deuteronomy: Notes on the Pentateuch. (Neptune, NJ: Loizeaux Brothers, 1972), 547.

 

Thanks Keith!

 

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Jottings – The Blood of Christ in The Presence of God

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Real purity of walk will always be founded on the full assurance which the blood of Christ in the presence of God gives to our souls, and which we behold as having perfectly satisfied God about sin.

 

H.L. Rossier, “The Red Heifer,” in The Christian Friend, Vol. 15 (1888); electronic ed. accessed on 3/23/15 here: http://www.stempublishing.com/authors/rossier/RedHeif.html

 

Thanks Keith!

 

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Jottings – It is an Immense Comfort to be Able to Say Nevertheless God

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Commenting on 2 Corinthians 7:6 ~

 

It is an immense comfort, in the inward storms and conflicts of the heart, to be able to say, “Nevertheless God.” Oh, what a divine solace there is in Him, now made known to us in Christ.

 

Turpin, W. T. “Nevertheless God.” Collected Writings of W.T. Turpin. Morganville, NJ: Present Truth, 1999. 413. Print.

 

 

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Jottings – Theological Arguments

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I beg leave, in my turn, to give you a few advices,

 

1. Be calm. Do not venture into the field again till you are master of your temper.

 

2. Be good-natured. Passion is not commendable; but ill nature still less.

 

3. Be courteous. Show good manners, as well as good nature, to your opponent, of whatever kind.

 

4. Be merciful. When you have gained an advantage over your opponent, do not press it to the uttermost. Remember the honest quaker’s advice to his friend a few years ago: ‘Art thou not content to lay John Wesley upon his back, but thou wilt tread his guts out?’

 

5. In writing, do not consider yourself as a man of fortune, or take any liberty with others on that account. Men of sense simply consider what is written; not whether the writer be a lord or a cobbler.

 

6. Lastly, Remember, ‘for every idle word men shall speak, they shall give an account in the day of judgment.’ Remember, ‘by thy words shalt thou be justified; or by thy words shalt thou be condemned.’

 

John Wesley, “Some Remarks on Mr. Hill’s Farrago Double Distilled,” quoted in Luke Tyerman, The Life and Times of the Rev. John Wesley, Vol. 3. (London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1871), 162.

 

Thanks Keith!

 

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Jottings – Ministers While Employed in Watching Over Others Are So Solemnly Warned Against Neglecting Themselves

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If we study Divine subjects merely as ministers, they will produce no salutary effect. We may converse with the most impressive truths, as soldiers and surgeons do with blood, till they cease to make any impression upon us. We must meditate on these things as Christians, first feeding our own souls upon them, and then imparting that which we have believed and felt to others; or, whatever good we may do to them, we shall receive none ourselves. Unless we mix faith with what we preach, as well as with what we hear, the word will not profit us. It may be on these accounts that ministers, while employed in watching over others, are so solemnly warned against neglecting themselves: ‘Take heed unto yourselves and to all the flock,’ &c.—‘Take heed unto thyself, and unto the doctrine; continue in them; for in doing this thou shalt both save thyself and them that hear thee.’”

 

Andrew Gunton Fuller, “Sermon LXIX: Preaching Christ,” in “Sermons & Sketches” in The Complete Works of Andrew Fuller: Memoirs, Sermons, Etc., ed. Joseph Belcher, Vol. 1. (Harrisonburg, VA: Sprinkle Publications, 1988), 501.

 

Thanks Keith!

 

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Jottings – The One Who Doubts is a Double Minded Man Unstable in All His Ways

“James“


Commenting on James 1:5-8 ~

 

Changeableness is an evidence of an unsubdued will and generally, too, of an inflated ego, which leads one to be occupied unduly with the importance of his own affairs.



 
H. A. Ironside, Expository Notes on the Epistles of James. (Neptune, NJ: Loizeaux Brothers, 1947), p. 15.

 

Thanks Keith!

 

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Jottings – Our Sins Were the Cause of His Sorrows

Matthew


On Matthew 26:47-56 ~

 

We see in these verses the cup of our Lord Jesus Christ’s sufferings beginning to be filled. We see Him betrayed by one of His disciples, forsaken by the rest, and taken prisoner by His deadly enemies. Never surely was there sorrow like His sorrow! Never may we forget… that our sins were the cause of these sorrows! Jesus was ‘delivered for our offenses.’ (Romans 4:25.)

 

J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on Matthew. (New York: Robert Carter & Brothers, 1860), pp. 366f.

 

Thanks Keith!

 

 

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Jottings – Wisdom to Know How to Act in Time of Persecution

“Matthew“


Commenting on Matthew 24:16 ~

 

For one thing, we see that flight from danger may sometimes be the positive duty of a Christian. Our Lord Himself commanded his people under certain circumstances ‘to flee.’ The servant of Christ undoubtedly is not to be a coward. He is to confess his master before men. He is to be willing to die, if needful, for the truth. But the servant of Christ is not required to run into danger, unless it comes in the line of duty. He is not to be ashamed to use reasonable means to provide for his personal safety, when no good is to be done by dying at his post. There is deep wisdom in this lesson. The true martyrs are not always those who court death, and are in a hurry to be beheaded or burned. There are times when it shows more grace to be quiet, and wait, and pray, and watch for opportunities, than to defy our adversaries, and rush into the battle. May we have wisdom to know how to act in time of persecution! It is possible to be rash, as well as to be a coward—and to stop our own usefulness by being over hot, as well as by being over cold.

 

J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on Matthew. (New York: Robert Carter & Brothers, 1860), pp. 318f.

 

Thanks Keith!

 

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