Jottings – Cultivating A Spirit of Humility

“Jottings“

Commenting on Matthew 26:56:

 

Let us learn from the passage lessons of humiliation and self-abasement. Let us resolve by God’s grace to cultivate a spirit of lowliness, and self-distrust. Let us settle it in our minds, that there is nothing so bad that the best of us may not do it, unless he watches, prays, and is held up by the grace of God. And let it be one of our daily prayers, ‘Hold thou me up, and I shall be safe.’ (Psalm 119:17.)

 
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J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on Matthew. (New York: Robert Carter & Brothers, 1860), p. 370.

 

Thanks Keith!

 

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Jottings – If We Desire to Walk with God Let us Never Forget to Watch and Pray

“Jottings“

Commenting on Matthew 26:41:

 

If we desire to walk with God comfortably, and not fall, like David or Peter, let us never forget to watch and pray. Let us live like men on enemy’s ground, and be always on our guard. We cannot walk too carefully. We cannot be too jealous over our souls. The world is very ensnaring. The devil is very busy. Let our Lord’s words ring in our ears daily like a trumpet. Our spirits may sometimes be very willing. But our flesh is always very weak. Then let us always watch and always pray.

 
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J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on Matthew. (New York: Robert Carter & Brothers, 1860), p. 366.

 

Thanks Keith!

 

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Jottings – Our Sins Were the Cause of His Sorrows

Matthew


On Matthew 26:47-56 ~

 

We see in these verses the cup of our Lord Jesus Christ’s sufferings beginning to be filled. We see Him betrayed by one of His disciples, forsaken by the rest, and taken prisoner by His deadly enemies. Never surely was there sorrow like His sorrow! Never may we forget… that our sins were the cause of these sorrows! Jesus was ‘delivered for our offenses.’ (Romans 4:25.)

 

J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on Matthew. (New York: Robert Carter & Brothers, 1860), pp. 366f.

 

Thanks Keith!

 

 

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Jottings – Wisdom to Know How to Act in Time of Persecution

“Matthew“


Commenting on Matthew 24:16 ~

 

For one thing, we see that flight from danger may sometimes be the positive duty of a Christian. Our Lord Himself commanded his people under certain circumstances ‘to flee.’ The servant of Christ undoubtedly is not to be a coward. He is to confess his master before men. He is to be willing to die, if needful, for the truth. But the servant of Christ is not required to run into danger, unless it comes in the line of duty. He is not to be ashamed to use reasonable means to provide for his personal safety, when no good is to be done by dying at his post. There is deep wisdom in this lesson. The true martyrs are not always those who court death, and are in a hurry to be beheaded or burned. There are times when it shows more grace to be quiet, and wait, and pray, and watch for opportunities, than to defy our adversaries, and rush into the battle. May we have wisdom to know how to act in time of persecution! It is possible to be rash, as well as to be a coward—and to stop our own usefulness by being over hot, as well as by being over cold.

 

J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on Matthew. (New York: Robert Carter & Brothers, 1860), pp. 318f.

 

Thanks Keith!

 

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Jottings – Jesus Knows

Jottings

It ought to comfort the saints and servants of the Lord when they feel weary. Let them call to mind that Jesus is full of ‘compassion.’ He knows what a world it is in which they live. He knows the body of a man and all its frailties. He knows the devices of their enemy, the devil. And the Lord pities His people. Let them not be cast down. They may feel that weakness, failure, and imperfection are stamped on all they do. But let them not forget that word which says, ‘His compassions fail not.’ (Lamentations 3:22-23.)

J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on Matthew, (New York: Robert Carter & Brothers, 1860), p. 187.

 

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Jottings – Let Us Speak of Jesus

Jottings

Commenting on Luke 24:13-35: “Let us learn a lesson from the two travelers to Emmaus. Let us speak of Jesus, when we are sitting in our houses and when we are walking by the way, whenever we can find a disciple to speak to. (Deuteronomy 6:7.) If we believe we are journeying to a heaven where Christ will be the central object of every mind, let us begin to learn the manners of heaven, while we are yet upon earth. So doing we shall often have One with us whom our eyes will not see, but One who will make our hearts ‘burn within us’ by blessing the conversation.”

J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on Luke, Vol. 2. (New York: Robert Carter & Brothers, 1879), p. 499.

 

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Jottings – The Cross

Jottings

As long as you live, beware of a religion in which there is not much of the cross. You live in times when the warning is sadly needful. Beware, I say again, of a religion without the cross.

J.C. Ryle, “The Cross of Christ,” in Old Paths: Being Plain Statements of Some of the Weightier Matters of Christianity. London: Charles J. Thynne, 1898, p. 249.

 

 

 

 

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Jottings – Going to Church Without Going to Christ

Jottings

On Matthew 10:14-15: “This is a doctrine fearfully overlooked, and one that deserves serious consideration. Men are sadly apt to forget, that it does not require great open sins to be sinned, in order to ruin a soul for ever. They have only to go on hearing without believing, listening without repenting, going to Church without going to Christ, and by and bye they will find themselves in hell! We shall all be judged according to our light. We shall have to give account of our use of religious privileges. To hear of the ‘great salvation,’ and yet neglect it, is one of the worst sins man can commit. (John 16:9.)”

J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on Matthew, (New York: Robert Carter & Brothers, 1860), p. 96-97.

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Jottings – A Deep Sense of Need

Jottings

Regarding Mark 5:25: “Let us mark… how different are the feelings with which people draw near to Christ. We are told in these verses that ‘much people followed’ our Lord, ‘and thronged him.’ But we are only told of one person who ‘came in the press behind,’ and touched Him with faith and was healed. Many followed Jesus from curiosity, and derived no benefit from Him. One, and only one, followed under a deep sense of her need, and of our Saviour’s power to relieve her, and that one received a mighty blessing.”

J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on Mark, (London: William Hunt, Steam Press, 1859), p. 99–100.

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Christmas Jottings – Simeon

Christmas Jottings

Regarding Luke 2:29

 
“What is it that can enable a mortal man to use such language as this? What can deliver us from that ‘fear of death’ to which so many are in bondage? What can take the sting of death away?

 
There is but one answer to such questions. Nothing but strong faith can do it. Faith laying firm hold on an unseen Saviour,—faith resting on the promises of an unseen God,—faith, and faith only, can enable a man to look death in the face, and say, ‘I depart in peace.'”

J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on Luke, Vol. 1. New York: Robert Carter & Brothers, 1879, pp. 67f.

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